News Article

VERMILION AUDIT & RESEARCH

Dr Nicola Kingsford PhD VetSci BscAg Bsc (Hons) is Vermilion’s Research & Audit Co-ordinator. Her task is to carry out research and internal audits, both of which are seen as essential components of the clinic’s patient safety and quality improvement processes.

Dr Kingsford has recently submitted a paper to Oral Surgery on the safety and efficacy of intravenous sedation using midazolam only or combinations of two or three drugs. This follows a recent audit of patients who required advanced sedation techniques for complex oral surgery procedures.

Complete List of Authors: David Offord, Vermilion; Ross Paterson, Vermilion; Nicola Kingsford, Vermilion; Craig Mather, Glasgow Dental Hospital & School, Oral Surgery; Nigel Robb, Griffith University School of Dentistry and Oral Health, School of Dentistry and Oral Health.

ABSTRACT
Aim:This retrospective observational study evaluates the safety and efficacy of intravenous sedation using midazolam only or combinations of two or three drugs including propofol and alfentanil for complex dental surgery such as implant placement or sinus augmentations.
 
Methods:The study analyses 60 patients aged between 42-79 who required advanced sedation techniques for complex oral surgery procedures. Twenty patients had midazolam only(M), 10 patients a 2-drug combination of midazolam and propofol (MP) and a third group of 30 patients had the combination of midazolam, propofol and alfentanil (MAP). The last two regimens were carried out under the supervision of a dedicated consultant anaesthetist.

Results:Higher mean minimum heart rate (beats/min) was observed in the midazolam group compared to the group sedated with the three-drug regimen P<0.001. The time between the last drug administration (LDA) and end of surgery (EOS) was significantly longer(p<0.005) in group M(≤45mins) compared to the other two sedation groups MP and MAP (≤15 minutes). The final titration of midazolam of 11.2 ± 4mg(5-20mg) was a significantly greater in group M than in either of group MP or MAP(p<0.005). Conclusion:In patients requiring conscious sedation to undergo complex and lengthy oral surgery, a combination of agents (midazolam, propofol and alfentanil) can provide a predictable steady state of sedation up to the end of the surgery resulting in better operating conditions for the surgeon and improved patient experience.The shorter duration of action drugs propofol and alfentanil improved haemodynamic stability, sedation quality and reduce the final doses of each sedative agent.

Audits completed in 2018/19 with BDA Section and date completed

Advanced conscious sedation, BDA 1.36, May 2018

Justification and evaluation of radiographs, BDA 2.24, Oct 2018

Treatment plan options, consent and preferred method of pain control, BDA 1.25 and 1.26, Feb 2019

Medical History Form Updates, BDA 1.36, Jul 2019

Conscious sedation (2nd cycle), BDA 1.36, Aug 2019

Clinical records (3 new clinicians), BDA 1.6, Aug 2019

Health care waste audit, BDA 2.16, Sep 2019

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